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authorSean Whitton <spwhitton@spwhitton.name>2018-09-27 13:13:08 -0700
committerSean Whitton <spwhitton@spwhitton.name>2018-09-27 13:13:08 -0700
commit8e67cc409fd5b45eb95afd7727ea906a3de2a689 (patch)
tree70296d8e774d0a89ebb63b5327b890cac9d1cb49
parente2ebd1ce6909a18225c33df769cc3c060052ac13 (diff)
downloadwiki-8e67cc409fd5b45eb95afd7727ea906a3de2a689.tar.gz
reword and expand
-rw-r--r--blog/entry/aristotledndalignments.mdwn7
1 files changed, 5 insertions, 2 deletions
diff --git a/blog/entry/aristotledndalignments.mdwn b/blog/entry/aristotledndalignments.mdwn
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--- a/blog/entry/aristotledndalignments.mdwn
+++ b/blog/entry/aristotledndalignments.mdwn
@@ -2,6 +2,9 @@ Aristotle's distinction in *EN* between brutishness and vice might be
comparable to the distinction in *Dungeons & Dragons* between chaotic
evil and lawful evil, respectively.
-I've always thought that lawful evil characters are ultimately more
-threatening than chaotic evil characters. In the *Critical Hit*
+I've always thought that the forces of lawful evil are more deeply
+threatening than those of chaotic evil. In the *Critical Hit*
podcast, lawful evil is equated with tyranny.
+
+Of course, at least how I run it, Aristotelian ethics involves no
+notion of evil, only mistakes about the good.