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[[!meta date="2014-09-18 06:55:00"]]
[[!meta title="Chomsky on popular knowledge of sports"]]
[[!tag  imported_PyBlosxom politics usa]]

[Noam Chomsky: Why Americans Know So Much About Sports But So Little
About World
Affairs](http://www.alternet.org/noam-chomsky-why-americans-know-so-much-about-sports-so-little-about-world-affairs?paging%3Doff&current_page%3D1#bookmark)

Lately I've been spending time on reddit reading ideas in the comments
about how we should think about and respond to the Snowden revealations,
and similar leaks relating to the behaviour of well-financed branches of
government.

We've no good reason to believe in conspiracy theories so I'm not sure
how we ought to think claims that the system is actively working against
citizens to maintain its power. In particular, it's often claimed that
the media is used to distract people from real issues. No one individual
is behind that, so should we think of the government as constituting an
agent, that manipulates the population through the media, as the
macro-level effect of the various actions its employees make? Do we then
need to think of the government as pre-meditating these things, or might
something akin to evolutionary theory better explain what happens? Or is
the lack of demand for real news throughly the fault of the
non-government? I'd like to read some political scientists writing about
ths.

Relevant song: John Mayer -- Waiting on the World to Change